Corinne Hutton, Quadruple amputee ‘thrilled’ after double hand transplant

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Corinne Hutton, Quadruple amputee 'thrilled' after double hand transplant
Corinne Hutton, Quadruple amputee 'thrilled' after double hand transplant

A SCOTS mum who had parts of all four limbs amputated to save her life has undergone surgery for a double hand transplant.

Corinne Hutton, 47, endured the complicated 12-hour op after a match was found following a five-year wait.

And medics last night hailed her bravery after she nearly died when acute pneumonia and sepsis robbed her of her hands and feet.

Professor Simon Kay said: “Corinne is one of the most positive, resilient and determined people I have met. Despite all the hurdles she has faced she has now got the hands she wished for.

“She didn’t go into this lightly, she researched it deeply and understood the risks and benefits.

“She realises what a remarkable life-affirming gift she has received from an unknown family devastated by grief.

“She’ll be forever grateful.”

After more than a dozen false alarms, Corinne, of Lochwinnoch in Renfrewshire, was told this week a match for her blood group, skin tone and hand size had been found.

Charity Finding Your Feet revealed the ex-graphics firm owner was whisked 235 miles by ambulance to Leeds General Infirmary.

Surgeons — including Scots Professor Andrew Hart who amputated her limbs in 2013 — began the procedure at 1pm on Monday.

It’s believed to have been the UK’s sixth double hand transplant.

After beating just a five per cent chance of survival, Corinne campaigned to raise awareness of organ and limb donation.

She was the first female quadruple amputee to scale Africa’s tallest mountain, Kilimanjaro.

Corinne has also conquered Ben Nevis, abseiled, cycled, skied and had ballroom dancing lessons.

Finding Your Feet has raised more than £700,000 through fundraising and donations.

A spokesman said: “We’re certain she’ll continue to inspire people as she builds up strength and learns to use her new hands.

“It’s bittersweet because transplants require a donor. That person and her family have made it possible for a mum to hold her son’s hand again.”

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