UK: Portuguese man o’ war are washing up on beaches

By on October 4, 2017
UK: Portuguese man o' war are washing up on beaches

UK: Portuguese man o’ war are washing up on beaches

More Portuguese man o’war than ever before are washing up on beaches across UK.

According to social media posts, there have been recent sightings at Freshwater, Brook and Whitecliff.

The creatures, which are not jellyfish but siphonophores, can still deliver a painful sting after days stranded on land.

You should not touch one, or allow children or pets to do so either.

Colony Structure, Tentacles, and Venom

The man-of-war comprises four separate polyps. It gets its name from the uppermost polyp, a gas-filled bladder, or pneumatophore, which sits above the water and somewhat resembles an old warship at full sail. Man-of-wars are also known as bluebottles for the purple-blue color of their pneumatophores.

The tentacles are the man-of-war’s second organism. These long, thin tendrils can extend 165 feet in length below the surface, although 30 feet is more the average. They are covered in venom-filled nematocysts used to paralyze and kill fish and other small creatures. For humans, a man-of-war sting is excruciatingly painful, but rarely deadly. But beware—even dead man-of-wars washed up on shore can deliver a sting.

Muscles in the tentacles draw prey up to a polyp containing the gastrozooids or digestive organisms. A fourth polyp contains the reproductive organisms.

Movement

Man-of-wars are found, sometimes in groups of 1,000 or more, floating in warm waters throughout the world’s oceans. They have no independent means of propulsion and either drift on the currents or catch the wind with their pneumatophores. To avoid threats on the surface, they can deflate their air bags and briefly submerge.

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