Second Brexit Referendum Poll: 53 per cent compared to 47 per cent who still back Brexit

By on June 22, 2018
Second Brexit Referendum Poll: 53 per cent compared to 47 per cent who still back Brexit

Second Brexit Referendum Poll: 53 per cent compared to 47 per cent who still back Brexit

Brexit latest: Britons favour second referendum by 23 point margin, poll shows.

Nearly half of voters want a final say before Britain formally leaves the EU, according to the survey.

And support for staying in the EU is now 53 per cent compared to 47 per cent who still back Brexit, the poll by Survation found.

The projected result would reverse the result of the referendum which took place two years ago tomorrow and saw Leave win by 52 per cent to 48.

Polling for ITV’s Good Morning Britain found that 48 per cent of those questioned wanted a second referendum on the final Brexit deal, against just 25 per cent who did not. Some 18 per cent said they did not have an opinion and nine per cent did not know.

Those supporting a new referendum included 35 per cent of Leave voters and 66 per cent of those who back Remain.

The polling comes ahead of a planned march by pro-EU campaigners in central London on Saturday.

Labour MP Chuka Umunna, a leading supporter of the People’s Vote campaign for a second referendum, said: “This new polling shows just how much momentum is building behind the campaign for a People’s Vote on the final Brexit deal.

“This Saturday will see tens of thousands from all over the UK marching for a People’s Vote in London and support is growing across the country.”

The survey found that 43 per cent of voters back a “soft Brexit” – in which the UK would stay in both the single market and customs union – while 37 per cent favour a “hard Brexit” in which Britain would leave both.

Some 57 per cent of 2017 Labour voters backed a soft Brexit, against 23 per cent who prefer a hard version.

Almost half (47 per cent) of more than 1,000 people questioned thought leaving the EU without a deal would be bad for Britain, compared to 32 per cent who said it would be good for Britain.

Only 35 per cent of people said Brexit would be good for the UK economy, while 39 per cent said it would be bad.

Eloise Todd of the Best for Britain campaign said: “MPs from all parties risk being two years out of date. It’s time to follow the will of the people and put the terms of the Brexit deal to them in a people’s vote.

“Across the country, doubts about Brexit mean people have started to change their mind – politicians must not ignore that; the public would never forgive them.”

The survey also found limited understanding among voters of some of the key issues in the Brexit debate.

Just 17 per cent of those taking part could identify the correct definition of the customs union, while 38 per cent chose the correct description of the single market.

About Staff

To contact the editors responsible for this story: [email protected]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.